This nice old Buck knife had the tip snapped off

This nice old Buck knife had the tip snapped off

I was able to regrind the blade and restore the tip, although it lost a little length.

I was able to regrind the blade and restore the tip, although it lost a little length.

A closeup of the re-ground tip with a nice, sharp edge.

A closeup of the re-ground tip with a nice, sharp edge.

Click here to get a repair estimate.

Reshaping steel

If a blade is broken or has severe nicks and gouges in the edge, it isn't necessarily a lost cause.  In many cases, it can be repaired by grinding out the damage.  However, if the damage extends beyond the sharpen-able edge of the blade, then it can't be saved.  Contact me for a free estimate and I'll let you  know if I think I can save your knife, or other edged tool.  Repairing a blade often requires drastic measures, which may mean the use of power tools, although I keep that to a minimum.  

Using paper wheels won't over-heat the steel.

Using paper wheels won't over-heat the steel.

The sanding belts I use move at relatively low speeds to keep from over-heating the blade.

The sanding belts I use move at relatively low speeds to keep from over-heating the blade.

Gentle and Cool

For any service requiring the use of a grinding wheel, I always use a paper wheel with grinding compound (either silicon dioxide or diamond) on the surface.  This provides a gentle, cool grinding process that removes the necessary steel without overheating the blade.  Using a stone grinding wheel can easily ruin a blade in just a second. Don't let anyone use a stone grinding wheel on your knives!  I will also sometimes use a grinding belt.  The slow-moving belts also stay very cool, and they give some added flexibility, which is an advantage for certain types of repairs. 

After repairing your blade, I will also sharpen it with no extra fees.  That is all included in my repair estimate.